Salience Anxiety Treatment Center

Our Anxiety Center

Anxiety is important; it is our brain's natural way of protecting us. However, in many cases, anxiety goes from being a protective factor to being debilitating and intrusive into our lives and daily functioning.

Anxiety is a feeling of unease or tension associated with the anticipation of a future event. Anxiety is a normal emotional state which is very necessary for our survival. When ever one is in a situation that may be threatening or dangerous, we need our brain to be aware, alert, and to evaluate the level of risk.

We also need our brain to signal our body and prepare it to respond to the situation. For example, you are walking your dog at night and hear a horn blast when you step off the curb. Your brain goes on alert in response to the loud noise and associates that noise to the threat of a car in the road. Your heart rate increases, your muscles tense, and your breathing becomes shallower and faster. This allows you to respond quickly to the threat and move out of the path of the oncoming vehicle. This is part of your fight/flight response.

South American young woman standing outside wearing jacket during fall season. A happy pensive hispanic girl
South American young woman standing outside wearing jacket during fall season. A happy pensive hispanic girl

Our Anxiety Clinic

Anxiety is important; it is our brain's natural way of protecting us. However, in many cases, anxiety goes from being a protective factor to being debilitating and intrusive into our lives and daily functioning.

Anxiety is a feeling of unease or tension associated with the anticipation of a future event. Anxiety is a normal emotional state which is very necessary for our survival. When ever one is in a situation that may be threatening or dangerous, we need our brain to be aware, alert, and to evaluate the level of risk.

We also need our brain to signal our body and prepare it to respond to the situation. For example, you are walking your dog at night and hear a horn blast when you step off the curb. Your brain goes on alert in response to the loud noise and associates that noise to the threat of a car in the road. Your heart rate increases, your muscles tense, and your breathing becomes shallower and faster. This allows you to respond quickly to the threat and move out of the path of the oncoming vehicle. This is part of your fight/flight response.

pexels-вальдемар-2224699

When should I seek care for Anxiety?

While anxiety is a normal, common emotional state which everyone experiences, for some individuals, anxiety can become impairing. When a person experiences excessive worry, fear, or anticipation of threats even when there is no immediate threat in the environment, anxiety can begin to impair their ability to function. When anxiety symptoms become severe, it becomes difficult for the person to focus on daily tasks because they are overwhelmed with anxiety. Once an individual finds that their symptoms of anxiety get in the way of social, family, relationships, work, or school, it is time to get help!

Whether your anxiety is mild, social, or panic-related, our evidence-based treatment can make a difference.

Life and circumstances cause reasonable levels of worry and fear, but if these symptoms last longer than 2 weeks and impact your ability to function, it is time to seek care:  

  • Excessive worry
  • Interpersonal issues -- health, family, school, work 
  • Lack of sleep
  • Fatigue 
  • Agitation, irritability, restlessness 
  • Muscle tension
  • Poor concentration

 

 

pexels-вальдемар-2224699

When should I seek care for Anxiety?

While anxiety is a normal, common emotional state which everyone experiences, for some individuals, anxiety can become impairing. When a person experiences excessive worry, fear, or anticipation of threats even when there is no immediate threat in the environment, anxiety can begin to impair their ability to function. When anxiety symptoms become severe, it becomes difficult for the person to focus on daily tasks because they are overwhelmed with anxiety. Once an individual finds that their symptoms of anxiety get in the way of social, family, relationships, work, or school, it is time to get help!

Whether your anxiety is mild, social, or panic-related, our evidence-based treatment can make a difference.

Life and circumstances cause reasonable levels of worry and fear, but if these symptoms last longer than 2 weeks and impact your ability to function, it is time to seek care:  

  • Excessive worry
  • Interpersonal issues -- health, family, school, work 
  • Lack of sleep
  • Fatigue 
  • Agitation, irritability, restlessness 
  • Muscle tension
  • Poor concentration

 

 

You are not Alone

Anxiety disorders are the most common behavioral health disorders, affecting nearly 29% of the entire population. If you experience anxiety, you are at risk for developing depression or other physical health problems.

Physical symptoms (heart racing, muscle tension, restlessness) are typically the most common reason people seek care for their anxiety.  Relief from anxiety is possible, but if left untreated can have a negative impact on your overall wellness.

Anxiety Over the Lifespan

Anxiety disorders can cause a heavy burden if illness for those who suffer from them. Anxiety can shrink your world as avoidance begins to take over. When an individual avoids situations or places as a way of trying to prevent future experiences with anxiety, they may find temporary relief. Unfortunately, anxiety will recur, and the person now finds themselves avoiding new situations. Avoidance just breeds more avoidance until the person becomes severely impaired or even housebound.

As individuals age, they may face medical conditions and treatments that may make them more vulnerable to anxiety. Grief, loss, social isolation, changes in living situations, and role changes as people exit the work force can cause stress and worry.

Anxiety disorders often occur alongside other disorders. Some of the commonly co-occurring illnesses include: 

  • Other anxiety disorders
  • Major Depressive Disorder
  • Dysthymic Disorders (chronic depression)
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorders
  • Somatoform Disorders
  • Substance Use Disorders
  • Trauma-related disorders such as PTSD
  • ADHD
  • Eating Disorders

Patients with anxiety disorders often present to emergency rooms or to their Primary Care Provider's office because of the physical manifestations of anxiety. Additionally, many medical conditions, or their treatments, can cause a patient to feel very anxious including:

  • Thyroid disorder
  • Periods of hormonal change such as menopause
  • Lung diseases such as asthma and COPD
  • Cardiovascular illness: arrythmias, chest pain, fear after a cardiac event
  • Irritable Bowel Disorder
  • Cushing’s Disease
  • Migraine
  • Neurological illnesses
  • Pain Disorders
  • Medications: steroids, bronchodilators, weight loss medications, decongestants
Patient Centered Care Anxiety Center

Patient Centered Care

Salience Health has created a specialized evidence-based and remission focused program to help get your depression and anxiety under control:

  • Collaborative Care and Treatment Planning
  • Screening and Treatment of Physical Symptoms associated with Depression 
  • Cognitive and Genetic Testing
  • CBT Therapy
  • DBT Therapy (Dialectical Behavioral Therapy)
  • TMS Therapy
  • Medication Management
  • Neurofeedback
  • Dedicated Care Navigators to guide you through your Care
Patient Centered Care Anxiety Center

Patient Centered Care

Salience Health has created a specialized evidence-based and remission focused program to help get your depression and anxiety under control:

  • Collaborative Care and Treatment Planning
  • Screening and Treatment of Physical Symptoms associated with Depression 
  • Cognitive and Genetic Testing
  • CBT Therapy
  • DBT Therapy (Dialectical Behavioral Therapy)
  • TMS Therapy
  • Medication Management
  • Neurofeedback
  • Dedicated Care Navigators to guide you through your Care

Our Approach to Treating Anxiety

Identifying the source of anxiety can be complex as there are biological, genetic, environmental, and situational factors at play. Often times, symptoms start to present in childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood and continue to grow from there. Exposure to trauma or high levels of stress only intensify these symptoms by sending cues of fear and anxiety to our brain.

Our approach will help you address all the factors that contribute to anxiety including:

  • Biological and genetic factors
  • Medications
  • Stress-related contributors
  • Co-existing medical illness
  • History of trauma
  • Social support
  • Lifestyle changes (including diet and exercise)

Our team of specialists will construct a customized treatment plan based on the most current medical evidence. Depending on your medical history, current symptoms, and testing results, you and your care team will discuss all the options available that will best support your recovery.

pexels-andrea-piacquadio-818819
pexels-andrea-piacquadio-818819

Our Approach to Treating Anxiety

Identifying the source of anxiety can be complex as there are biological, genetic, environmental, and situational factors at play. Often times, symptoms start to present in childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood and continue to grow from there. Exposure to trauma or high levels of stress only intensify these symptoms by sending cues of fear and anxiety to our brain.

Our approach will help you address all the factors that contribute to anxiety including:

  • Biological and genetic factors
  • Medications
  • Stress-related contributors
  • Co-existing medical illness
  • History of trauma
  • Social support
  • Lifestyle changes (including diet and exercise)

Our team of specialists will construct a customized treatment plan based on the most current medical evidence. Depending on your medical history, current symptoms, and testing results, you and your care team will discuss all the options available that will best support your recovery.

The Many Faces of Anxiety

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Generalized Anxiety Disorder: tension, feeling “on edge”, difficulty with concentration or having your “mind go blank”, muscle tension, poor sleep, becoming easily fatigued.

Panic Disorder

Palpitations, shakiness, choking sensations, shortness of breath, racing thoughts, fears of dying or going crazy, numbness in hands or feet, dizziness, feelings of unreality. Often associated with avoidance of places, situations, or people that the individual associates as a trigger.

Social Anxiety Disorder

Fear of being in situations where an individual may feel scrutinized or embarrassed, fears further embarrassment with the thought that others may recognize their embarrassment, anticipatory anxiety and distress over being around unfamiliar people or social situations.

More Severe Symptoms Include:

Suicidal thinking, severe avoidance causing impairment in daily function. These disorders can increase the risk for depressive illness and substance use disorders.

The Many Faces of Anxiety

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Generalized Anxiety Disorder: tension, feeling “on edge”, difficulty with concentration or having your “mind go blank”, muscle tension, poor sleep, becoming easily fatigued.

Panic Disorder

Palpitations, shakiness, choking sensations, shortness of breath, racing thoughts, fears of dying or going crazy, numbness in hands or feet, dizziness, feelings of unreality. Often associated with avoidance of places, situations, or people that the individual associates as a trigger.

Social Anxiety Disorder

Fear of being in situations where an individual may feel scrutinized or embarrassed, fears further embarrassment with the thought that others may recognize their embarrassment, anticipatory anxiety and distress over being around unfamiliar people or social situations.

More Severe Symptoms Include:

Suicidal thinking, severe avoidance causing impairment in daily function. These disorders can increase the risk for depressive illness and substance use disorders.

Anxious Depression

Coexisting Anxiety with Depression is more successfully treated when both are addressed rather than treating each alone. They are two sides of the same coin; if one is left untreated, the other soon follows.

  • Feeling tense and restless
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Excessive worry/fear
  • Loss of control

Treatment Options

Most people seeking relief from anxiety and depression will progress through several options or may need a combination of interventions to achieve the best outcomes. It is important for you to work with your provider on the following options:

  1. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
  2. Medication Management
  3. Diet
  4. Exercise
  5. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS)

Our Services

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) Therapy is a safe and effective treatment that uses MRI strength pulses to treat the cause of mood disorders like depression. Unlike medication, which only treats symptoms, TMS Therapy strengthens the network of your brain that regulates your mood.

During outpatient, non-invasive sessions, TMS treatments encourage positive brain activity, helping to create long-term relief from depression and often other mood disorders.

A Computerized Neurocognitive Screening (CNS) is an assessment that measures how well your brain is managing tasks, such as working memory, concentration, processing speed, and executive functioning. These results can provide insight into how you may perform in your daily life at work and at home, and help your provider identify levels of impairment. The overall duration takes about one hour to complete.

We know that behavioral health and physical health go hand-in-hand, and this assessment helps us see how they are impacting each other. The Brainview test is a cognitive assessment that provides information on your brain's functionality related to stress, memory, and cognition, while also tracking physical functions such as heart rate and metabolic rates. This test will help your provider develop a more informed treatment plan for you and better coordinate your overall care.

We also offer Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) group classes to help train patients to learn how to better manage their symptoms. The basis of CBT is that if we can change the way we think, we can change the way we feel & act. These classes are different from the typical group therapy session and are conducted in a virtual classroom setting.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is psychotherapy treatment that helps patients curb anxious or depressive episodes. CBT allows individuals to better understand that their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are all linked together.

Each session is designed to help you to examine the attitudes that play a role in how you might interpret various situations. By the end of each course, you should be able to correct automatic negative thoughts that lead you to struggle with depression, anxiety, fear, or hopelessness.

Medications are an important part of our comprehensive care plan and are often used alongside other treatments. Our providers will need to review what medications you have already taken, how effective those were and how well you tolerated them, and the impact of those medications on your overall health.  They will also continually track your progress and side effects with medication trials for any necessary adjustments.